open
<
1/6
  • In Gansbaai, the largest white shark ever caught was at Danger Point and measured up to 5.9m. The exact world record white shark is a contested issue, but chances are it is between 6-7m.

  • If you see a white shark in the water don’t panic. Chances are high that the shark has already detected you and isn’t interested. White shark attacks are normally associated with poor visibility, so avoid murky conditions.

  • White sharks have a unique system called a “counter current heat exchange”, which keeps their body  tempreture +/- 7C above the surrounding water temperature. 

  • All sharks have an incredibly unique system on the tip of their nose called the “ampillae of Lorenzini”. These are small pores filled with a gel that transmits the electrical currents in the water to the shark’s brain so that it can assess its environment.

  • White sharks give birth to live young (not eggs), and they give birth to 6-8 pups at one time. Pups are usually between 1.0-1.5m in length and are born with teeth.

  • Body language has been a well documented form of shark communication and has identified body arching, jaw gaping, and other postures as specific social tactics.

>

Sharkwatch SA Blog

Book Now

Minister of Tourism goes shark cage diving with Marine Dynamics

Author: Anwynn Louw (Social Media Manager)

Marine Dynamics Tours proudly hosted the Minister of Tourism, Derek Hanekom, on their shark cage diving boat Slashfin. The Minister’s reaction upon seeing the sharks: “Seeing these great white sharks, seeing them underwater and nearby is something quite unique and I would strongly recommend that everyone should do it sometime in their lifetime”. The water was a warm 19,7degrees and five great white sharks were seen. Hanekom was joined by his wife Trish who enjoyed the research aspect shared by the marine biologists on board - "Such a fabulous experience, a unique combination of shark diving, responsible tourism, science, education, conservation and benefits for communities. Thank you.”

Owner of Marine Dynamics, Wilfred Chivell, was on board. Chivell bought Marine Dynamics in 2005. He established the Dyer Island Conservation Trust in 2006 and has changed the way shark cage diving is viewed by investing in research and conservation not only of the great white shark but also the African penguins and the other marine animals in the area.

Prior to the shark trip the Minister helped release five adult African penguins from the African Penguin and Seabird Sanctuary (APSS) where they had recently received treatment.  This important rehabilitation centre for seabirds in the Overstrand was officially opened by Hanekom at the end of February 2015. The penguins should head back to Dyer Island, a natural and important breeding colony for these birds.Hanekom visited the African Penguin and Seabird Sanctuary prior to leaving and made a donation toward the rehabilitation. His parting words for his trip: "Thank you so much for a most incredible, unforgettable experience!  Exciting and informative.  Never too old to do adventure tourism.

Marine Dynamics won the African Responsible Tourism Award at World Travel Market Africa held in Cape Town in May and the National Lilizela Award for Best Visitor Experience: Marine Adventure. Hanekom who handed out the Lilizela awards said, "Marine Dynamics offers a unique and exciting adventure: diving with sharks. Tourists remember this remarkable experience in our ocean forever. They encounter our amazing biodiversity up close, and they tell others about it. By creating meaningful and memorable experiences, Marine Dynamics is helping to position South Africa as a competitive global destination with unique attractions, and is spreading the valuable message of marine conservation around the world. The Department of Tourism applauds your outstanding work to showcase our country internationally.”

Watch the video here

Further information: Marine Dynamics  /  Daily Trip Blog - 17 December 2015









comments powered by Disqus