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  • In Gansbaai, the largest white shark ever caught was at Danger Point and measured up to 5.9m. The exact world record white shark is a contested issue, but chances are it is between 6-7m.

  • If you see a white shark in the water don’t panic. Chances are high that the shark has already detected you and isn’t interested. White shark attacks are normally associated with poor visibility, so avoid murky conditions.

  • White sharks have a unique system called a “counter current heat exchange”, which keeps their body  tempreture +/- 7C above the surrounding water temperature. 

  • All sharks have an incredibly unique system on the tip of their nose called the “ampillae of Lorenzini”. These are small pores filled with a gel that transmits the electrical currents in the water to the shark’s brain so that it can assess its environment.

  • White sharks give birth to live young (not eggs), and they give birth to 6-8 pups at one time. Pups are usually between 1.0-1.5m in length and are born with teeth.

  • Body language has been a well documented form of shark communication and has identified body arching, jaw gaping, and other postures as specific social tactics.

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Daily Blog 04 December 2018 | Cage Diving South Africa

Wednesday, December 05, 2018 |  0 Comment

Author: Marine Dynamics (Shark Cage Diving Company)
Marine Dynamics is a Shark Cage Diving company based in Kleinbaai, a small harbour town, part of Gansbaai in the Western Cape of South Africa. This area is known as a hotspot for the Great White Shark and the best place in the world to see and dive with these iconic creatures in their natural environment.

Guest Comments:

“Had a great time, would highly recommend!!” – Drew

“Brilliant!” – Ben

01/12/2018

Location: Joubertsdam

Water Temperature: 16.6°C + 16.6°C

Depth: 9.3m + 11.3m

Visibility: 0.5m + 0.5m

Conditions:  A beautiful, sunny day with some swell and the wind picking up in the afternoon.

We embarked on two tours today, setting out at 8am on our first trip of the day and making our way towards The Shallows after a day off the sea. We’ve had a westerly wind blowing for the last couple of days, which means that the water is not too cold but that we’ve got just a bit of swell rolling into the area.

After getting our divers all suited up, we got lucky and had our sharks pop up within the first 10 minutes on anchor, this set the pace for the rest of the tour with the sharks hanging out with us throughout the few hours we spent anchored. We watched the Copper Sharks and had animals of all shapes and colours visit us, much to the delight of all who got into the cage to experience the wonders of being under the water with such a gorgeous predator.  we got to see the sharks surface and ambush from below, and we even got a view of two Cape Fur Seals who passed by our boat a time or two before heading off.

Trip 2 also had sharks within minutes and we had just an awesome a trip as the first, with constant activity around the cage. This made for a fun and exciting time on the water, although the wind began to pick up which made for an adventurous time on the water. We were also treated to the sight of Copper Sharks of all sorts, some with some old battle wounds which have now healed up to black scars which can be used to distinguish the individual animals. After spending a lovely couple of hours out, we made our way back to port for soup, bread and a ginger ale or two.

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