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  • In Gansbaai, the largest white shark ever caught was at Danger Point and measured up to 5.9m. The exact world record white shark is a contested issue, but chances are it is between 6-7m.

  • If you see a white shark in the water don’t panic. Chances are high that the shark has already detected you and isn’t interested. White shark attacks are normally associated with poor visibility, so avoid murky conditions.

  • White sharks have a unique system called a “counter current heat exchange”, which keeps their body  tempreture +/- 7C above the surrounding water temperature. 

  • All sharks have an incredibly unique system on the tip of their nose called the “ampillae of Lorenzini”. These are small pores filled with a gel that transmits the electrical currents in the water to the shark’s brain so that it can assess its environment.

  • White sharks give birth to live young (not eggs), and they give birth to 6-8 pups at one time. Pups are usually between 1.0-1.5m in length and are born with teeth.

  • Body language has been a well documented form of shark communication and has identified body arching, jaw gaping, and other postures as specific social tactics.

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Sharkwatch SA Blog

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Great White Shark Cage Diving Daily Blog 04 December 2017 (Trip 1 + 2 + 3)

Author: Kelly Baker (Biologist)

Guest Comments: “What an experience! Crew were amazing and so friendly. Very informative and can't wait to tell our friends and family about it!" - Jack + Jody

"What an amazing time. Thank you for your knowledge, professionalism and kindness. THis was such a great morning thanks to your team!" - Ashley

"One of the best experiences of my life. Crew's knowledge was incredible, will recommend to everyone I know!" - Cara

04/12/2017

Location: Joubertsdam

Water Temperature: 15.9°C + 15.7°C + 15.6°C

Depth: 9.7m + 10.0m + 9.4m

Visibility: 0.5m + 0.5m + 0.5m

Number of Sharks: 2 + 1 + 1

Conditions: Clear day with a very small swell and wind increasing.

It is always nice to start a new week in a good way and what a better way than White shark cage diving?! We launched bright and early into calm enough conditions and within 15 minutes we were on anchor in the Shallows as the second boat out and one of the first to have a White shark sighting for the day. This first sighting was a large female, estimated just under 4.0m in length, that we have not yet documented in the bay this season. She is quite clean, in the sense that she has no real obvious scars to indicate an identification on sighting and she stuck around for much of the first part of the trip, making some impressive approaches at the bait and decoy lines before disappearing as our second shark of the trip appeared. This was Mini Nemo, a favourite male in this are and one we have been seeing approximately 4-5 times a year since 2012. He stuck around for majority of the rest of the trip before he too disappeared and the Copper sharks came streaming in. We finished the trip with atleast five different Copper sharks around the cage, a Cape Fur seal cautiously swimming around the boat and some Humpback dolphins porpoising in the distance before heading to the Islands and back to the harbour.

The second trip of the day launched to some choppier conditions as the wind picked up and made their way back onto anchor were moments later we were joined by Copper sharks. With the crews and guests eyes on the Copper sharks for close to 40 minutes, Mini Nemo took the chance to sneak in and made yet another spectacular experience for those on board. Sightings progress throughout the trip, a little slow but with sharks appearing here and there to make for another successful trip.

The third and final trip saw an exclusive for four passengers. The Copper sharks appeared as if it was magic and kept things flowing until halfway through the trip when we saw them disappearing. Could this disappearing act be influence by a larger shark? It appears so as a Great White shark then made its presence known to us all on board.

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